Something kind of like self expression, or more simply, just a matter of taste.

 

archatlas:

Ecce Hommo Tsang Kin-Wah

“Ecce Homo” is a phase used by Pontius Pilate when presenting Jesus to the public before crucifixion, which also became the title of a book written by Nietzsche.  By making reference to the last judgment of Jesus and Nietzsche’s philosophy, ‘Ecce Homo Trilogy’, a series of multi-channel video installations, tries to question the impartialness of a judgment, its existence and the powerlessness of the one being judged at a particular period of time and environment. At the same time, it attempts to depict the emotions of the one being judged and, the dense and tense atmosphere throughout the whole process. 

escapekit:

The World Font

Designer Yusuf Algan created an alphabet where each letter is made out of fonts in a specific international alphabet. 

monaux:

Typography Tips:
Lately I’ve had a few people ask me what fonts I use. I don’t use any fonts - I draw all my typography from scratch, and I encourage you to do the same! Typography is something that is frequently ignored or overlooked, but it is one of the most essential elements of design. I hate seeing beautiful illustrations ruined by lazy computer type.
I do occasionally base my type on various existing typefaces (usually from Victorian posters & advertisements), but I always modify the characters and invent new ones.
Here’s my process for creating logo/header typography: I start by ruling myself some guides so the characters have a uniform height. Then, I work out how wide each character should be. This is generally one width with exceptions for wide characters such as Ms and Ws, and narrow characters like Is.
I then start drawing the letterforms and I always try to find ways to make them interact with one another. One trick to bind a block of type together is to make the letterforms flow and link with themselves. Crossbars (like in capital As and Hs) are good to experiment with, as are curly bits like in Gs, Cs, Js and Rs. After I’m happy with how everything is working, I ink it.
If you’re serious about learning typography, my favourite book on the subject is called “Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age”. It’s a collection of hundreds of excellent examples of typography that no letterer should be without. It also pays to know about the basic principles of typography - how different typefaces handle different letters, which parts should be thickened, when you should include serifs and what style they should be, how kerning and leading affect how a piece of type looks, and so on. It could be helpful to take a course on it (I studied it at university), but I’m pretty sure you can learn everything you need to know simply by being observant.

monaux:

Typography Tips:

Lately I’ve had a few people ask me what fonts I use. I don’t use any fonts - I draw all my typography from scratch, and I encourage you to do the same! Typography is something that is frequently ignored or overlooked, but it is one of the most essential elements of design. I hate seeing beautiful illustrations ruined by lazy computer type.

I do occasionally base my type on various existing typefaces (usually from Victorian posters & advertisements), but I always modify the characters and invent new ones.

Here’s my process for creating logo/header typography: I start by ruling myself some guides so the characters have a uniform height. Then, I work out how wide each character should be. This is generally one width with exceptions for wide characters such as Ms and Ws, and narrow characters like Is.

I then start drawing the letterforms and I always try to find ways to make them interact with one another. One trick to bind a block of type together is to make the letterforms flow and link with themselves. Crossbars (like in capital As and Hs) are good to experiment with, as are curly bits like in Gs, Cs, Js and Rs. After I’m happy with how everything is working, I ink it.

If you’re serious about learning typography, my favourite book on the subject is called “Scripts: Elegant Lettering from Design’s Golden Age”. It’s a collection of hundreds of excellent examples of typography that no letterer should be without. It also pays to know about the basic principles of typography - how different typefaces handle different letters, which parts should be thickened, when you should include serifs and what style they should be, how kerning and leading affect how a piece of type looks, and so on. It could be helpful to take a course on it (I studied it at university), but I’m pretty sure you can learn everything you need to know simply by being observant.

(Source: karlkwasny)

pulmonaire:

Created by Yale-graduates Caspar Lam and YuJune Park of Synoptic OfficeAlphabet Topography is a physical examination of letterforms as it relates to usage frequency. 

"Kinetics" was an exploration into human movement and relating it to illustrative typographical elements. To achieve the footage to show human motion at the level needed we shot with a scientific high-speed camera at 500 frames per second in HD on a green screen for the performance. The subject of break-dancing was used because of its raw beauty of illustrating human motion. Typography is used as an illustrative element in this piece supporting the kinetics of the motion. The typeface Didot was chosen because it combined a modern feel with classic serifs. 

The Homework ate my dog. - Chinese kinetic typography assignment.

gregmelander:

FONT STORE
trendd:

I really like the idea of a physical Apple-esque store that sells fonts (and other typography related goods).
“Playtype.com, one of Europe’s preeminent online font foundries, has  opened a gorgeous brick-and-mortar shop in Copenhagen dedicated to  flogging digital typefaces. Customers can walk in off the street and buy fonts loaded on USBs that resemble little credit cards. The shop also sells a ragbag of typographic gifts and paraphernalia, including T-shirts, posters, and even wine.
E-Types, the Danish design  agency behind Playtype.com, bills the shop as “the first of its kind” in  the world. We can’t verify that, but it’s certainly a departure from  the standard practices of the day, in which type foundries, both big and  small, distribute their wares as downloads or via email.” 
(via World’s First: An Apple Store for Type Geeks [Slideshow] | Co.Design)

gregmelander:

FONT STORE

trendd:

I really like the idea of a physical Apple-esque store that sells fonts (and other typography related goods).

Playtype.com, one of Europe’s preeminent online font foundries, has opened a gorgeous brick-and-mortar shop in Copenhagen dedicated to flogging digital typefaces. Customers can walk in off the street and buy fonts loaded on USBs that resemble little credit cards. The shop also sells a ragbag of typographic gifts and paraphernalia, including T-shirts, posters, and even wine.

E-Types, the Danish design agency behind Playtype.com, bills the shop as “the first of its kind” in the world. We can’t verify that, but it’s certainly a departure from the standard practices of the day, in which type foundries, both big and small, distribute their wares as downloads or via email.” 

(via World’s First: An Apple Store for Type Geeks [Slideshow] | Co.Design)